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Complex Trademark Packaging Design – Izumov
Graphic Design, Packaging, Product Design
- 2017
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process

The project for Izumov brand was one of the most large-scale, complex, and interesting for our studio since its inception. This was defined both by the amount of work undertaken, since the general trademark included more than half a dozen sub-brands in different categories, as well as a strategic approach to the project in general, where each element was processed in detail and influenced all the other brands within the trademark. That is why we have decided to feature the entire project in stages, by breaking down the umbrella brand Izumov into its constituent sub-brands, and tell more about each of them.

However, the story should begin with the creation of the Izumov brand itself, which was also our studio’s task. The client has approached us with a general vision of the brand, which had to emphasize the products’ geographic attribution to the Crimea region, and at the same time engage nostalgic emotions associated with the Tzarist Russia of the 19 century. Besides, we had to develop a basis for an entire collection of brands that would share the common concept of the trademark.

The base of the Izumov brand is a story of the settlement called Iziumovka located in the southern part of Crimea, where a hussar corps was located at the end of the 18th century. The place featured a unique microclimate that was optimal for growing grape. That is why when the hussar corps was relocated from the settlement, in a short period of time a vineyard was established, which served as the basis for the Izumov trademark of our days.

All the sub-brands in the trademark Izumov share certain traits and stylistic solutions. And it’s not about a common style or default graphic elements. It’s more a question of common aesthetics, spirit, which wield some references to the classic period of Russian culture with the distinct packaging design solutions common for this era. However, in each case there was a separate approach, which rendered an individual character for each product within the general trademark, making each of them an object of separate interest.